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ISSYS wins patent for sensor tech in Ypsilanti, adding positions

Integrated Sensing Systems, AKA ISSYS, recently received a patent for one of its minimally-invasive procedures used to insert its sensing technology,

The Ypsilanti-based tech firm designs and develops microelectromechanical systems for medical and scientific sensors. Its technology (miniature, wireless, batteryless, sensing implants) can be used in a variety of ways, such as wirelessly monitoring a heart or as fluid sensors in industrial manufacturing. The new patent is part of Integrated Sensing Systems’ sensor implementation as part of a minimally-invasive procedure, such as arthroscopic surgery.

"The patent covers how you do the actual implementation," says Nader Najafi, president & CEO of Integrated Sensing Systems.

The 19-year-old company has hired four people over the last year, including three engineers and an administrative person. It now has a staff of close to 30 people and is looking to hire another three people in engineering and quality control.

Integrated Sensing Systems has experienced incremental growth over the last year, but Najafi is optimistic that 2015 should bring double-digit revenue gains. He points out that Integrated Sensing Systems technology has received government approval for a few countries in Europe, which should clear the way for more sales.

"The potential for expansion has improved dramatically for 2015," Najafi says.

Source: Nader Najafi, president & CEO of Integrated Sensing Systems
Writer: Jon Zemke

Coherix growth continues on strength of global work

Talk to Dwight Carlson about manufacturing for any length of time and he will tell you about how it has become a global venture. The founder & CEO of Coherix, which makes software for advanced manufacturing, knows because so much of the revenue for his Ann Arbor-based business comes from well-outside of its hometown's borders.

"We are truly global," Carlson says. "More than 75 percent of our advanced manufacturing technology is shipped outside of the U.S., and that is only going to increase."

Coherix's principal technology provides high-speed, high-definition 3D measurement and inspection services to manufacturers. The software is designed to streamline a manufacturer’s production capability by finding efficiencies through high-tech, optical-based measurement and inspection of the manufacturers assembly processes.

The 10-year-old company has operations in China and Japan. It also has subsidiaries in Singapore and Europe, all of which have consistently grown in recent years.

"Europe is starting to take off with sales to Opel and Ford," Carlson says.

Coherix has hired five people in the U.S. over the last year. It currently has a staff of 40 employees and the occasional intern in Ann Arbor. To Carlson, there is no better place to do the white collar side of the business.

"It's an excellent place to do high-tech R&D," Carlson says. "There is a reason why Toyota has $100 million invested in R&D here."

Source: Dwight Carlson, founder, chairman & CEO of Coherix
Writer: Jon Zemke

Dynamic Robotic Solutions aims to double in size

KMT Robotic Solutions is rebranding itself as Dynamic Robotic Solutions, and the Auburn Hills-based company has some big plans for growth over the next few years.

"Our goal is to double in size over the next 3-5 years," says Dick Johnson, director of business development and marketing for Dynamic Robotic Solutions.

The 29-year-old company has made a name for itself in robotic trimming with more than 1,500 of its systems installed around the world. Dynamic Robotic Solutions more specifically works with water jet cutting. So while the water coming out of a faucet may clock in at 20-25 psi, the water Dynamic Robotic Solutions's robots use spits out at 65,000 psi. That’s strong enough to take the flesh off your finger.

"If you add in a little bit of sand into the stream you can cut two-inch steel," Johnson says.

Robotic cutting is often used in manufacturing, such as cutting the roof liners in cars, carpet for automotive floor mats, and plastic in instrument panels.

The company had its best year in 2012 in regard to revenue growth and is on track to have another strong year. It has hired five people over the last year, expanding its staff to 60 employees. It’s also looking to hire a handful of people in software engineering and sales.

Source: Dick Johnson, director of business development and marketing for Dynamic Robotic Solutions
Writer: Jon Zemke

Liberty Title adds jobs as real-estate market rebounds

This last winter with its polar vortexes forced real-estate companies like Liberty Title to go into hibernation for a few months to deal with what became a literally frozen real-estate market. Things were so slow during December, January, and February that it was almost like the company took the quarter off.

"We had a big hole in the first quarter to dig out of," says Tom Richardson, general counsel of Liberty Title.

That hasn't stopped the Ann Arbor-based company from realizing some solid gains this year. It helps that the local real-estate market has heated up and property values have risen with it. Richardson points out that houses that sold for $60,000 a year or two ago are not selling for $100,000, and he sees price gains continuing.

"I don't see any slowdown," Richardson says. "Interest rates seem like they will stay flat in 2015 and the economy in southeast Michigan is strong."

That has allowed Liberty Title to consolidate some gains across Metro Detroit and add staff. The company has moved its Brighton office into a new building near the heart of the city's downtown. It has hired six people, expanding its staff to 98 employees. Those new hires include new office managers in Birmingham and Novi.

"We picked up some highly experienced people," Richardson says.

Source: Tom Richardson, general counsel of Liberty Title
Writer: Jon Zemke

LogiCoul Solutions makes semifinals of Accelerate Michigan

If it's the little things that add up in life, then LogiCoul Solutions is well on its way to collecting more than its fair share this year.

The Sterling Heights-based startup that calls the Macomb-OU INCubator home has made a number of base hits in 2014, putting it into position to make a significant score before the end of the year. The battery-enhancement technology startup was one of the 20 presenters at the Michigan Growth Capital Symposium last summer and recently made the semifinals of this fall's Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition. It also received the patent for its technology last July.

"That's very exciting for us," says David Stout, executive vice president of LogiCoul Solutions.

The 6-year-old company is developing technology that sends electromagnetic waves to a battery, which lowers resistance and creates more useful energy. The bottom line is a longer-lasting and more energy-efficient battery. The company started out with the idea of using it on lithium-ion batteries but switched to a lead-acid battery focus to take advantage of a much bigger market.

"We have never met a battery our process didn't like," Stout says.

The three-person startup is currently looking to hire a vice president of engineering. It also hopes to lock down a seed capital round later this year or early next year to continue the push toward developing its technology.

Source: David Stout, executive vice president of LogiCoul Solutions
Writer: Jon Zemke

Ka-Ching! develops new easy-to-use instruction technology

Inspiration hit Bill Crose when he was trying to come up with a better way to train hotel workers. At the time he was working as the eLearning development manager for Intercontinental Hotels Group, figuring out the best way to train housekeepers, cooks, and bartenders to do their jobs.

"Really anybody who is doing a step-by-step procedure," Crose says.

That's when the idea for Ka-Ching! popped into his head. He left his job and started working on the Rochester Hills-based startup, a client of the Macomb-OU INCubator. Ka-Ching! is developing Pythia, a training system that audibly streams step-by-step directions through a mobile-headset audio device. It comes with completion-time reports for each step and a patent-pending interface between voice response, text-to-speech, and Wi-Fi technologies to link custom databases to the device.

"Anything that is a task that you don't know how to do can be delivered to you in a step-by-step process," Crose says.

Which means it could be used by businesses and large organizations looking to train employees. It could also be used by consumers who are trying to learn how to cook with certain recipes or people at the gym following a trainer’s routine.

Ka-Ching is currently in the early stages of developing its prototype. Crose expects to work on perfecting the prototype over the next year and have it ready for commercialization in time for the 2015 holiday shopping season.

Source: Bill Crose, CEO of Ka-Ching!
Writer: Jon Zemke

Beet Analytics Technology doubles staffing in Plymouth

Beet Analytics Technology software for manufacturers is gaining traction. The Plymouth-based startup has doubled in size over the last year as its software platform has established itself in the market, and the firm is on target to continue that growth streak.

"If things go as planned we should double our size in the next 6-12 months," says David Wang, CEO of Beet Analytics Technology.

The firm provides diagnostic and analytical tools that accelerate problem solving in complex manufacturing and automation operations. Its software improves problem identification and reduces production downtime so the user can optimize productivity gains.

"The market we are looking at is hidden from everyone," Wang says. "The potential is very, very large. Probably billions of dollars."

The 3-year-old company has landed a couple of contracts with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) from around the world. Beet Analytics Technology now claims to have landed contracts or is in talks to sign with half of the 10 largest OEMs in the world.

"We are on the verge of winning a contract for another large OEM," Wang says.

That has allowed Beet Analytics to more than double its staff over the last year. The firm has hired seven people in senior automotive engineering and intellectual property professionals, expanding its staff to a dozen employees and one intern.

Source: David Wang, CEO of Beet Analytics Technology
Writer: Jon Zemke

PishPosh expands space with eye for maker education

The team at PishPosh has been working all summer toward building out new studio space in downtown Detroit, and now the podcasting and video production startup is about to embark on a new line of business -- maker education.

PishPosh plans to start offering day-long classes in mid October that teach people how to building new technology. The firm wants to ensure that classes are affordable -- think spending a few hundred dollars to learn how to build a drone or an arcade-style video game console. When classes conclude, participants get to walk out with their new toys.

"They get a box with all the parts they need," says Michael Evans, co-founder of PishPosh. "They get lunch, and then they get to leave with what they built."

Both Evans and his partner, Ben Duell Fraser, are instructors at Grand Circus, where classes in how to create software often cost thousands of dollars. They believe that PishPosh's new classes will complement Grand Circus' offerings and help grow the local tech community by giving them a broader range of education options.

The classes are set to take place in a 600-square-foot space in PishPosh's offices in the Department of Alternatives, a downtown Detroit-based entrepreneurial collective near Grand Circus Park. The walls in the education room are up and are covered in primer paint. Evans and Duell Fraser expect to finish off the space within the next few weeks.

"This is our training room," Evans says. "We're thinking of calling it PishPosh Academy."

PishPosh made its name with its "Slash Detroit" online video series, a roundup of the local news with a sharp sense of humor. Duell Fraser serves as the main anchor of the broadcast. The startup has toyed with making other shows over the last year and is now playing around with other formats, such as an uncensored version of the Friday Fahles where local media members give their take on current events.

PishPosh has expanded into 2,000 square feet at the Department of Alternatives to keep up with its current workload. Not only is it doing its Slash Detroit episodes and preparing to offer maker classes, it is doing custom video work, such as creating a documentary on Code Michigan for the state of Michigan. The company needed bigger and more intricate work/studio space to keep up with its portfolio of projects.

"If everything goes the way we want it to go, it wouldn't be too long before we needed the extra space anyways," Duell Fraser says.

Source: Michael Evans and Ben Duell Fraser, co-founders of PishPosh
Writer: Jon Zemke

RedViking's engineers score awards as firm adds staff

RedViking likes to think of itself as the home to some of the top engineering talent in Metro Detroit. Now it has some hardware to back it up.

Three of the Plymouth-based testing company’s employees (Chris Lake, Greg Giles, and Jason Stefanski) recently were recognized in Plant Engineering's "Engineering Leaders Under 40" class for 2014. The awards recognize up-and-coming talent in the engineering sector of manufacturing.

"Each of those guys has a strong background in engineering," says Randy Brodzik, president & CEO of RedViking. "As we have grown they have grown with us and helped us grow."

The 31-year-old company, a wholly owned subsidiary of Superior Controls, builds testing systems for manufacturers in the automotive, defense, and aerospace industries. The testing systems, which often focus on power train systems, are quite precise and require extensive engineering. RedViking has experienced a significant bump in growth in recent years on the strength of manufacturers, including automotive. Aerospace work has supplied its biggest gains over the last year.

That has allowed RedViking to hire a number of people. The company currently has a staff of about 200 employees and half a dozen interns. It has added 15 jobs (mostly engineers) in the last year and is looking to hire another 10 people right now. Those jobs include engineers, sales, and project managers. The company is holding a job fair at its headquarters (46247 Five Mile Road in Plymouth) between 4-8 p.m. on Oct. 23. More info here.

"One of the things we have been successful at is recruiting strong engineering talent," Brodzik says.

Source: Randy Brodzik, president & CEO of RedViking
Writer: Jon Zemke

Covaron Advanced Materials raises seven-figure Series A

Big changes have taken place at Covaron Advanced Materials over the last year. The Ann Arbor-based startup has brought in a new CEO, raised a seven-figure Series A, and consolidated its investor circle to one person.

Covaron Advanced Materials, formerly Kymeira Advanced Materials, is developing a new chemistry for ceramics. The new technology was developed by company founder Vince Alessi and co-founders Cam Smith and Reed Shick. The advanced ceramics formula makes ceramics a more affordable and streamlined option for a number of molds and durable goods, such as those used in the automotive sector.

"We are a game-changing technology for a lot of industries," says Michael Kraft, CEO of Covaron Advanced Materials.

Which explains why it won the student portion of the Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition in 2012. And then the main competition at Accelerate Michigan in 2013. It also raised a $300,000 seed round from a number of local venture capital organizations, like Ann Arbor-based Huron River Ventures and Invest Detroit's First Step Fund.

"We had a lot of help from the Ann Arbor SPARK Business Accelerator Fund," Kraft says.

Those investors are gone now. Kraft says a single investor he declined to name but described as a person who owns "a Michigan-based consortium of companies" bought out everyone else and provided the money for a Series A. Kraft declined to name the individual or the exact amount of the Series A besides saying it was in the "seven figures" and provide enough funding to grow the company for 24 months.

Kraft, a Michigan State University graduate, was recruited from California to serve as Covaron Advanced Materials' new CEO. He explains the plan is to focus on growing the company through targeted application development of its ceramics technology. The idea is to aim for a long-term growth cycle (similar to what life sciences startups go through) so it can maximize the use of its technology in several markets. Covaron Advanced Materials and its team of 10 people (all recently moved from independent contractors to full-time employees) plans to leverage the sole investor’s portfolio of firms to grow.

"We're in a consortium of companies that employs more than 1,000 people and has more than $150 million in capacity," Kraft says. "That gives you an idea of the support we have."

Kraft acknowledges this is a unique situation for a startup. There are no exit requirements or need to pump up artificial value or need to exit because a subset of the startup's investors needs to cash out. There is only the goal of growing a big business that could one day have its fingers in a lot of pies.

"We have choices," Kraft says. "We don't need to paint ourselves into a corner."

Source: Michael Kraft, CEO of Covaron Advanced Materials
Writer: Jon Zemke

The Inovo Group sees 30-50% revenue spike in each of last 3 years

The Inovo Group's growth rate is something to take notice of. The downtown Ann Arbor-based consulting firm has watched its revenue jump 30 percent to 50 percent in each of the last three years.

This last year the firm added four new clients. That work has enabled the innovation-consulting office to hire two people (analysts), expanding its staff to 13 employees and one intern.

"We are on a steady growth path," says Larry Schmitt, CEO of The Inovo Group.

The Inovo Group has made its way helping large corporations find new, more-efficient ways of doing things. That could range from finding new opportunities to discovering new technology for it to harness. The bottomline is The Inovo Group's clientele recognize that innovation is critical to their growth.

"When we get involved with a company we do it when they want to do something big," Schmitt says. "It's when they want to push their own boundaries."

The Inovo Group also made the moved to new office in January next to the Downtown Home & Garden. The 5-year-old company has now smoothly moved into the new space and used it to help grow its talent base.

"It has energized our environment," Schmitt says. "It's an attractive place for the people we want to recruit."

Source: Larry Schmitt, CEO of The Inovo Group
Writer: Jon Zemke

3LG Tech Solutions spins out with new database technology

3Leaf Group got its start with audio books 19 years ago in a room full of tapes. This year it's spinning out a tech startup, 3LG Tech Solutions, that specializes in database management. Make sense? Trust us, it will.

The Oak Park-based firm has grown to include more comprehensive DIY education solutions, such as streaming instructional videos and training assets. That meant a bigger immersion in technology and a lot of information to manage. The next thing the company knew, it had what it took to create solutions for next-generation database technologies.

That prompted the spinout of 3LG Tech Solutuons six months ago. Today the company and its team of a dozen people are putting the finishing touches on the software platform and working to establish sales with big clients. It currently is running a pilot with a Big 4 accounting firm and installing its software at a shoe manufacturer in Florida. It is also targeting government contracts, including sales in the defense sector.

"There are so many needs," says Stuart Newman, president of 3LG Tech Solutions. "There are so many exit points. We believe there is a lot of value we can bring to the table."

3LG Tech Solutions is currently working to land a variety of customers across industries, ranging from automotive to professional services. Newman points out his firm is doing the hard work of making the long sell to big clients that take a long time to make decisions. But when he gets them to bite he expects to make a lot of sales progress quickly, as soon as next year.

"I'd like to have four signed deals by December 31st," Newman says.

Source: Stuart Newman, president of 3LG Tech Solutions
Writer: Jon Zemke

Indratech turns green fiber padding into thriving biz

If you're sitting on a cushioned surface, chances are you're sitting on foam. Indratech wants to change that, and the Troy-based business is off to a good start.

The 10-year-old firm makes the Indura Performance Fiber. The patented fiber padding is marketed as "green, non-toxic, recycled and perfect for use in any bedding and furniture application."

"Anything you can sit or sleep on," says Surendra Khambete, president of Indratech.

The company currently employs about 100 people, including 10 at its headquarters. It has hired two people in Troy (a R&D engineer and an accountant) over the last year to help it keep up with its growth. Revenue has spiked by 15 percent over the last year. The company sees its product as the replacement for foam.

"The good thing about foam is it's really tough," Khambete says. "If you sit on it, it will come right back up when you get up. The bad thing about foam is it's really toxic to produce."

Indratech boasts that Indura Performance Fiber has all of the attributes of foam but without any of the environmental costs.

"We are trying to get our foothold in the crib market, the mattress market, the automotive market," Khambete says.

It is also working with appliance makers to provide Indura Performance Fiber as an insulating material.

"We can make it quieter and warmer," Khambete says.

Source: Surendra Khambete, president of Indratech
Writer: Jon Zemke

Detroit Aircraft grows to 12 people, eyes acquisition

There was once a time when Detroit was the center of not only the automotive world, but the aviation world, too. Back in the early 20th century, the Detroit Aircraft Corp produced more aircraft than any other company and owned a number of subsidiaries, including the company that is now Lockheed Martin. The Detroit Aircraft Corp didn’t survive the Great Depression.

"It struck me that if it had survived that time we would have an automotive industry and an aerospace industry," says Jon Rimanelli.

That inspired Rimanelli to launch Detroit Aircraft Corp, the 21st century version of its namesake company specializing in unmanned aircraft (drone) technology and operating out of Detroit City Airport. Rimanelli first started playing with the idea when speaking to NASA officials about how the U.S. aviation and radar systems need to be reformed to accommodate to 21st century technology. Rimanelli believes that such reforms could open up the vast majority of U.S. airports to most of the populace, which currently doesn't have access to them because its members can’t facilitate commercial flights.

"99 percent of the population gets access to one percent of the airports while one percent of then population gets access to the whole system," Rimanelli says.

He launched Detroit Aircraft Corp in 2011 with the idea of enabling that access through unmanned aircraft. He sharpened that vision earlier this year when Detroit Aircraft Corp won a contract with Lockheed Martin to manufacture battery charger stations in Detroit. It is currently looking to lock down another contract with Lockheed Martin to make drones.

That work has allowed Detroit Aircraft Corp to hire seven people over the last year, expanding its staff to 12 people. It is currently looking to acquire A3 Electronics in Livonia as it prepares to begin building hundreds of units and employ several dozen people.

"We'd like to lead the world in aircraft manufacturing not once, not twice, but three times," Rimanelli says.

Source: Jon Rimanelli, founder & CEO of Detroit Aircraft Corp
Writer: Jon Zemke

Flipsi Bottle pivots with new baby bottle product

Flipsi Bottle is pivoting. Not a lot but noticeably, especially for those who are old enough to drink from their own cup.

The Ann Arbor-based startup got its start with two brothers making a sport bottle that could be turned inside out for easy cleaning. The company prototype is made out of food-grade silicone that is flexible and non-toxic. Now Flipsi Bottle is making a bottle for babies that it plans to market as Flipsi.

"That is virtually done with development," says Jeff Plott, CTO of Flipsi Bottle.

The 1-year-old company and its team of three people plan to take the product to the ABC Kids Expo in Las Vegas this fall to find a strategic partner. It hopes to begin production early next year.

"We were able to crack the baby bottle first," Plott says. "We also saw that there is a big market for the baby bottle."

Flipsi Bottle has raised about $40,000 in winnings from business plan competitions this year. Among those wins was a second-place showing at the Greenlight Business Model Competition in March, which came with a check for $10,000.

Source: Jeff Plott, CTO of Flipsi Bottle
Writer: Jon Zemke
958 Emerging Technology Articles | Page: | Show All
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