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Homeward Healthcare turns 2015 pilot program into 2016 profits

Homeward Healthcare started this year testing its healthcare technology at Hurley Medical Center in Flint. It's ending this year with a successful pilot program and a few paying customers in its pocket, not to mention ambitions to take its business model national next year.

The 2.5-year-old startup has developed a mobile platform that enables clearer communication between hospital staff and patients. It provides a questionnaire to patients to illicit more frank information about their health free from social pressures to say certain things to impress doctors or other medical staff. The idea is to enable medical professionals to deliver better care.

"We use an interactive medical platform to provide risk stratification to help prevent patient re-admissions," says Joe Gough, president & CEO of Homeward Healthcare.

Homeward Healthcare's pilot program dealt primarily with cardiac patients. Kettering University is about to release a white paper on the results of the program that shows a 47 percent reduction in readmission of patients dealing with congestive heart failure and a 33.4 percent reduction in readmission in patients in general cardiac care.

"That translates to 69 fewer readmissions out of 1,000 patients," Gough says.

Homeward Healthcare has been able to translate that work into three paying customers, including Hurley Medical Center, Mammoth Hospital in California, and Evolution Hospital in Las Vegas. Homeward Healthcare also has a handful of other hospitals lined up to become customers in the first quarter of 2016. The health systems they are attached to could mean that Homeward Healthcare has customer ceiling of up 600 hospitals.

Homeward Healthcare plans to go national with its platform next year. Besides its office in Ann Arbor, it also has offices in Toledo and San Francisco. It employs 18 people, including 11 hires over the last year. Gough expects those numbers to rise as his team works to raise more seed capital. It closed on a $1.5 million Series A a year ago and is currently raising a $1 million bridge round with an eye on closing a Series B by the end of next year.

"We opened it (the bridge round) last week," Gough says. "We already have $250,000 in it."

Source: Joe Gough, president & CEO of Homeward Healthcare
Writer: Jon Zemke

Bike share program for greater downtown on track for 2016

Detroit has more than 170 miles of bike lanes and greenways, a number that continues to grow. If all goes according to plan, soon a bike share program will complement that infrastructure.

Wayne State University's Office of Economic Development started the feasibility study and helped raise awareness and funds for the proposed bike share before transitioning the program to the Downtown Detroit Partnership (DDP) in July 2015. .

The DDP since has announced a partnership with Henry Ford Health System/Health Alliance Plan and the Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT). Henry Ford/HAP has pledged a full three-year financial commitment to launch and operate the bike share, while DDOT is assisting DDP in acquiring federal grant funding as well as finding an equipment provider and operator for the bike share. The city and DDOT will issue an RFP later this month. The bike share is also receiving support from the Michigan Department of Transportation, Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, Hudson Webber Foundation, and Kresge Foundation.

Officials say roughly 350 bikes and 35 bike stations will be scattered throughout greater downtown following the first phase of implementation.

"We are super excited that a public bike share program is coming to Detroit," writes Todd Scott, executive director of Detroit Greenways Coalition, a greenways and bike lane advocacy group in the city, in an email to Model D. "This will be a great opportunity to get more people interested in biking throughout the greater downtown. We appreciate that the Downtown Detroit Partnership (DDP), Henry Ford Health System/HAP, and the city of Detroit have the vision and commitment to make this happen."

According to the League of American Bicyclists, Detroit is the fastest growing city in the country for commuter bicyclists. The group utilized census data to determine that instances of bike commuting in Detroit grew over 400 percent between the years 2000 and 2014.

More than 70 U.S. cities offer bike share programs. Should all go according to plan, Detroit's own will debut in 2016.

Writer: MJ Galbraith

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Ann Arbor startups score big wins at Accelerate Michigan

When Steve Schwartz went up to collect the ceremonial $100,000 check for taking second place at the Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition last week, he was surprised but not shocked. The CTO of Genomenon didn’t expect to win big, but he knew the Ann Arbor-based startup’s team has a lot of potential when it comes to the fight against cancer.

"We all know someone in our lives who has been impacted by cancer," Schwartz says. "We're all passionate about it."

Genomenon is a life sciences company developing a technology platform focused on personalized medicine with simplified genome interpretation software. It has an office in the Tech Brewery and at the University of Michigan. The U-M spinout's platform tackles the challenges of analyzing DNA sequencing data, including gathering, organizing and interpreting the results. This is process is called tertiary analysis and typically requires extensive manual review that can be frustratingly inefficient and error-prone. Genomenon’s software accelerates tertiary analysis so it can treat patients and publish findings faster.

The 1-year-old startup’s team of seven has built out the product and has begun introducing it to its first paying customers. A larger product roll-out is planned for next year.

"We are now in the process of raising a seed round," Schwartz says. "This (the Accelerate Michigan win for $100,000) is a nice little bump for our seed round."

Five other Ann Arbor-based startups, all of which receive help from Ann Arbor SPARK, also walked away from Accelerate Michigan with $25,000 in prize money. Those include Akervall Technologies (winning the advanced materials category), Arborlight (alternative energy), FlexDex (medical device), Workit Health (IT), and PicoSpray (Advanced manufacturing).

Accelerate Michigan is Michigan's biggest business plan competition. It awards more than $1 million in prizes each year. Ann Arbor-based startups normally dominate the winners circle each year.

Source: Steve Schwartz, CTO of Genomenon
Writer: Jon Zemke

Dyson acquires Ann Arbor's Sakti3 for $90M

It's the kind of acquisition many a startup hopes will come true: lithium-ion battery developer Sakti3 was bought by UK vacuum-maker Dyson to the tune of $90 million.

No plans have yet been announced for where the battery production facility will be based but Michigan is a possibility.

Excerpt:

"The $90 million acquisition — first reported by business-news site Quartz — reflects a win for clean-tech investors in Sakti3, including General Motors and Khosla Ventures. Dyson itself had already invested $15 million in Sakti3.

The University of Michigan spinoff company's founder and CEO Ann Marie Sastry will lead development of her technology as an executive for Dyson."

Read the rest here.

 

Pristine Impressions wins seed capital from Warrior Fund

Demetrius Dixon used to work as a carpet cleaner. He was the on-the-ground man in Detroit for a New York-based company. It was a good gig -- so good that it inspired him to launch his own business, Pristine Impressions.

That was a year ago. It started with Dixon just working on carpet cleaning. He then brought his brothers who has worked in things like property management and landscaping into the business. Now Pristine Impressions has expanded into a full-fledged property management firm with a list of a couple dozen clients.

"We're just growing," Dixon says.

Dixon is also a junior at Wayne State University, pursuing a bachelors degree in business management. He got some help from Blackstone LaunchPad, a university program that helps students turn their aspirations for launching a business into reality.

"It gave me all sorts of experience that will help me be a better business owner," Dixon says.

It also gave the Woodbridge-based company some seed capital. Pristine Impressions won $5,000 from Blackstone LaunchPad's Warrior Fund earlier this month as part of the program's pitch competition. Dixon and his brothers plan to put the money to use by purchasing $3,000 in new equipment and spending $2,000 to develop a software database to better run the back end of the business.

"I want to be a leading property management firm in Detroit," Dixon says.

Source: Demetrius Dixon, founder of Pristine Impressions
Writer: Jon Zemke

EMU develops phone app to promote better study habits

Here's something for older folks to grouse about: a phone app that rewards students for better study habits. Can't you almost hear them say, "How about good grades? Isn't that reward enough?" Oh, grandpa.

Excerpt:

"Students earn points for activities such as meeting with a tutor or success coach, attending campus events and more. Points accumulate and can be used to “purchase” items in a prize store or used at the end of the year to bid on major benefits such as free tuition, housing, a meal plan, a tablet device or gift cards to the campus book store."

Read the rest here.

EMU gets $3.26 million gift for special ed, music therapy programs

Eastern Michigan University was handed a $3.26 million gift from long-time supporters William and Delores Brehm. The philanthropic couple are dedicated to growing the university's special education programs and have, over the years, donated more than $8 million to the school.

Excerpt:

"Dee Brehm, herself a graduate of EMU’s special education program, says that their objective is to help train special education professionals and researchers who will lead the way in supporting people with disabilities as well as those who can benefit from music therapy."

Read the rest here

HistoSonics raises $3.5M as it pushes clinical trails forward

HistoSonics has closed on seven figures worth of seed capital over the last year as the Ann Arbor-based startup pushes forward the clinical trails of its biotechnology that treats prostate disease.

The 5-year-old company raised an $11 million Series A in 2009 and is in the process of raising a Series B. It raised $3.5 million in a couple of interim fundraising rounds over the last year as it preps to land an even bigger Series B.

"We're looking to do a much larger round next year," says Christine Gibbons, president & CEO of HistoSonics. "We're thinking the first quarter of 2016."

The University of Michigan spinout got its name by combining histo (meaning tissue) and sonics (meaning sound waves). The firm’s primary platform is a medical device that uses tightly focused ultrasound pulses to treat prostate disease in a non-invasive manner with robotic precision.

HistoSonics and its team of 15 people (four more than last year) is currently in the midst of its clinical trails, which it has completed enrollment in. It plans to expand that clinical trail in the next year and wrap it up by 2016. HistoSonics is also looking to add more applications for its platform over the next year, which it is looking for partners in the medical device world.

"This next round of financing we are looking for strategic partners and investors," Gibbons says.

Source: Christine Gibbons, president & CEO of HistoSonics
Writer: Jon Zemke

U-M opens a medical library without books

Technology is helping to reinvent the way we interact with libraries. U-M's Taubman Health Sciences Library just under went a a $55 million overhaul... and major rethinking of how it functions best.

Excerpt:

"Hundreds of thousands of books were moved to an offsite location and are available on demand for delivery, and by becoming "bookless" the school said that frees up space for medical student education. The facility on the school's Ann Arbor campus officially reopened over the weekend."

Read more here.

Ann Arbor startups score seed capital from Innovation Fund

A couple of Ann Arbor-based startups have taken the lion's share of seed funding from the initial round of the Innovation Fund Macomb Community College, Powered by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

MyFab5 and TurtleCell received the top awards, $100,000 each, from the Innovation Fund. The $100,000 investments are focused on helping push those startups toward large-scale funding.

"We're laying the foundation to accelerate our growth," says Omeid Seirafi-Pour, co-founder & CEO of MyFab5.

MyFab5's platform works through Instagram, allowing its users to take pictures of their meals at restaurants and then rank their experience. The 2-year-old company got its start allowing users to rank their top five businesses in certain genres in local areas, but transitioned to a photo-based version when it noticed its users liked using it with Instagram.

MyFab5 averages more than 300,000 users each month. That is more than double its user rate from last fall. MyFab5 users have shared over 1.25 million restaurant recommendations and photos. It now employs a staff of four and three interns.

The platform also streamlines social media marketing for restaurants, providing a dashboard that enables creation of custom marketing plans, analyzing audience, generating leads, creating and publishing social media posts, tracking and engaging fans, and creating analytics reports.

TurtleCell makes a smartphone case with retractable headphones so users can avoid tangled, broken or lost headphones.

The Innovation Fund made five investments overall in startups based in Metro Detroit. The total investment package from the came to $275,000. The $2.7 million fund focuses on stimulating economic development and job growth among promising Metro Detroit entrepreneurs and next-stage businesses with high-growth potential. Investments range from $25,000 to $100,000.

Source: Omeid Seirafi-Pour, co-founder & CEO of MyFab5
Writer: Jon Zemke

Oakland U's new dorm a study in energy efficiency

Oakland University's year-old student housing complex is a study in environmentally-conscious design and operation.

The university's achievements in preventing waste and lowering impact on the environment resulted in the $30-million Oak View Hall being awarded gold certification status in LEED - or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. The U.S. Green Building Council certifies projects based on categories such as sustainability, energy and atmosphere, indoor environmental quality, and others.

The nearly 165,000-square-foot, 500-bed residence was built to drastically lower the amount of waste typically generated during construction. Ninety-five percent of the construction waste was recoiled and 15 perencet of construction materials came from recycled products. In addition 20 percent of construction materials were made regionally, eliminating environmental damage from transportation.

The operation of the dorm includes dual-flush toilets, low-flow bathroom fixtures and shower heads, and 18-percent less energy use than typical dorm buildings.

Bike racks, preferred parking for low-emission vehicles, and shielded light fixtures helped the project secure gold LEED status.

Source: Eric Reikowski, spokesperson, Oakland University
Writer: Kim North Shine

Triune Specialty Trailers grows through client diversity

Triune Speciality Trailers relied on a select number of clients for revenue during most of its first decade in business. More recently, the Madison Heights-based firm made a conscious effort to expand its clientele, which has resulted in it tripling in size over the last three years.
 
"We have a much more diverse client base that we used to have," says Harry Kurtz, president & CEO of Triune Specialty Trailers. "We also have a lot of business in Canada, which is exciting to us."

The 10-year-old company specializes in making state-of-the-art specialty trailers. It products now include designing and building trailers for mobile marketing, educational outreach, and custom trailers.

Triune Specialty Trailers' growth has allowed it to hire three people over the last year, expanding its staff to 15 employees and an intern. Its new hires include a couple of office administration workers and a welder.

"We would hire more if we could find more welders," Kurtz says.

One of Triune Specialty Trailers’ biggest successes over the last year is its Fab Lab mobile education and training vehicle. The Fab Lab is a mobile training classroom for training students in high-tech machining careers, such as computer numerical controlled programmers. Triune Specialty Trailers designed and created the Fab Lab for the Northern Lakes Economic Alliance and North Central Michigan College to help create more skilled professionals to fill openings for skilled machinist positions.

"It's a big issue, especially in Michigan," Kurtz says.

Source: Harry Kurtz, president & CEO of Triune Specialty Trailers
Writer: Jon Zemke

Ann Arbor's robot city

The University of Michigan has opened Mcity, a $6.5 million, 32-acre simulated urban and suburban environment where self driving cars and mechanical pedestrians run wild.

Okay, maybe not run wild. But it does make you wonder when they'll open WestWorld.

Excerpt:

"The University of Michigan opened Mcity, the world's first controlled environment specifically designed to test the potential of connected and automated vehicle technologies that will lead the way to mass-market driverless cars today."

Read the rest here.
 

Reveal Design Automation scores $50K from Zell Lurie Fund

Reveal Design Automation has scored a $50,000 investment from the Zell Lurie Commercialization Fund, a pre-seed investment fund from the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business.

The money is the last infusion of seed capital the University of Michigan spin-out will received. The angel investments and federal grants total nearly $4 million that is going toward the development of the Reveal Design Automation's semiconductor chip design technology. The $50,000 will go toward helping the Ann Arbor-based company land more customers.

"We have a sales team now," says Zaher Andraus, president & CEO of Reveal Design Automation. "They also provide customer support."

Reveal Design Automation specializes in developing electronic design automation software. The software helps simplify the complicated semiconductor chip design that shortens the verification timeline and lets makers bring it to market faster.

The firm has already finished the Version 1 of its platform and has deployed it to a couple of initial customers in industries like telecommunications and automotive. It now has a team of 12 people after adding a couple over the last year.

"I want to make sure we have more customers," Andraus says. "I'd like to have as many Tier 1 customers are we can support and 20-30 employees."

Source: Zaher Andraus, president & CEO of Reveal Design Automation
Writer: Jon Zemke

Ocunelis doubles sales of eye-drop tech since last year's launch

Ocunelis hit a significant milestone earlier this month when it sold its 400th DROPin, the company's signature eye-drop assist technology.

That milestone comes on the heals of the Ann Arbor-based bio-tech startup doubling its sales a little more than one year after launching the business. Ocunelis's DROPin products can be found in a few retailers across Metro Detroit, but the company is aiming for bigger gains elsewhere.

"Our primary sales are through Amazon," says David Lorch, CTO of Ocunelis. "We are selling in almost every state through Amazon."

Lorch and Marius Tijunelis came up with the idea to start Ocunelis while they were working through an entrepreneurial apprenticeship out of the Medical Innovation Center at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center. They saw eye drop application as a pain point in everyday medicine and came up with a easier, pain-free, eye-drop assist technology called DROPin.

They have since been working to expand sales and create a few partnerships to further expand the use of DROPin. The team is also working on a couple of new products it hopes to release relatively soon.

"I would assume that by 2016 we will be releasing new products," Lorch says.

Source: David Lorch, CTO of Ocunelis
Writer: Jon Zemke
617 Higher Education Articles | Page: | Show All
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